Saturday, January 10, 2015

Primary Colors

The only thing worse than being blind 
is having sight but no vision. 
~ Helen Keller




Imagine the Crayola world of a child.  Regardless of age or prowess, and with little need to be adroit they can conjure a world of squiggles and stickmen to rival Picasso; squiggles that translate to a castle or space flight or a talking dinosaur; squiggles that adorn a refrigerator as if the Louvre.   

From a platform of red, green and blue every other color in the spectrum is born.  Those three and their offspring are the humble servants of a child that needs little more to bring life to their own visions.   

Be it one color or hundreds, every single hue derives from the trichromatic of red, blue and green.  I'd find that hard to believe were it not for the fact that I've held in my own hands a paint color spectrum ~ you know them, the sort we'd find at Home Depot and that are used to figure out what color to paint a wall, or which shade matches an already existing color.  

The trichromatic principle is a fact in Crayola's world; the one seen with the eye.  But it's also true in the spiritual realm, seen only with the heart.   Think about it ... From faith, hope & love come every good and noble feature of the inner man.  Mix various doses of any or all of them to come up with a spectrum of color that includes such hues as patience, or forgiveness, or self-control.

As a child, once I learned there were far more Crayon shades than the 24 to which I'd been limited, I was not happy until I had a box of 120 for my very own.  I'm working on that still, trading the trichromatic world of Crayons for the equally trichromatic world of the spirit; and wondering just how many new shades of faith, hope & love are even possible. I want them all!  Because I know those three and their offspring are the humble servants of a child that needs little more to bring life to their own visions.  



Vision is the art of seeing 
what is invisible to others.  
~ Johnathan Swift








Primary colors are sets of colors that can be combined to make a useful range of colors.  For human applications, three primary colors are usually used since human color vision is trichromatic. And the three colors that fall within each of the human cone cell sensitivity range are red, green and blue. 

Wikipedia:  Primary Colors



7 comments:

Nancy said...

What a beautiful analogy. I love this post and with your permission, I would love to use in our retreats.
I hope you are staying warm where you are and continuing to enjoy the countryside....

Nel said...

I always love your posts because they make me think!
until next time...nel

Tori Leslie said...

This was a neat post and now I feel so much smarter!

Tori Leslie said...

This was a neat post and now I feel so much smarter!

Sharon said...

OK, I loved this post!! Colors are amazing, I am captivated by the nuances possible. If you ever try to paint the interior (or exterior) of a house, you'll begin to understand how subtle color can be. Shades and tints and hues. Colors in the same color family can clash or complement. It's fascinating!

But, what I loved the most about this post was how you then turned the same principle to our spiritual lives. Such good, good thoughts.

Yes, I want God to paint a multi-colored painting out of my life - with lots of faith, hope, and love.

GOD BLESS!

Sonja Goodson said...

Would you just LOOK at this beautiful blog!! So now I find out my word-wonder-woman friend is also artistic! This is impressive... the background sets the stage, and then come the thoughts... I could sit here and absorb for a long time tonight. Good job Kathleen. I'm in full agreement, which I always seem to be with you. :)

Just a little something from Judy said...

Since colors and the act of coloring are a part of my daily life right now, I must tell you how much I like the new look of your blog! Like Sonja stated, it is now not only your gift of words that speak to me, but it is also your artistic ability that draws me in. God has certainly blessed you with His gifts, and me with the privilege of seeing and reading them. I like your analogy on this post, and my mind is still chewing on it's contents:) Thank you!