Monday, February 28, 2011

Hebrew & Gentile Christians

Roughly ten years ago I found myself in a most baffling discussion with a young believer.  In rapid fire succession came questions about Jews & Judaism as compared to Christians & Christianity - questions about when & how the Church bid farewell to the Jewishness of Jesus; and how it developed so many doctrines & traditions that were, in many instances, diametrically opposed to what the ancient text has to tell us.  They were reasoned, respectful questions; and never in my life did I feel so impotent in answering them.

Mostly I sat somewhat dumbfounded; and I have never forgotten the feelings I had that day and those that followed it.  The good news (about The Good News), is that it sent me scurrying to the scriptures, to history books and commentaries, to Jewish believers in Christ, and to my knees.  Over the subsequent ten years I'd like to think I could answer some of those long ago questions in a reason-able way. 

I also realize I don't know what I don't know ...

I've mentioned him before, but Arnold Fruchtenbaum has bailed me out more than once on this subject, and many like it.  I just finished a work he did in 1983 entitled "Hebrew Christianity".  I'm still basking in the beauty of its contents; contents that would have helped me immeasurably during that long ago Q&A session.

Today I'm wondering what else I've overlooked, or erroneously absorbed where the Jewish flavor of God's word is concerned?



Footnote:  Let me say that I am delightfully blessed to be a Gentile believer in Jesus, and an equally blessed member of His Body, the Church.  This is not intended to market Judaism.  It's to emphasize how Jewish are Christian beliefs, and that rather than insist the Jewishness of the texts be Gentilized

6 comments:

RCUBEs said...

Sad that many of His own people rejected Jesus in His times. But it's great to know that many now are realizing that Jesus fulfilled everything as their Messiah. God bless.

~*~KIMBERLY~*~ said...

Over this post 9 months or so I've developed a relationship with a gal who is a Messianic Christian. She had brought to light some very informative thought provoking information. It's changed my views a bit about being a Jesus follower & all that entails. Many Americans have disected what Yeshua is really about.

Cindy said...

I've spent the past several years learning more about the richness of the Hebraic roots of my Christian faith. I'm not converting to Judaism and don't consider myself part of the Messianic movement, but I do understand that Jesus was Jewish and so much of what he taught in scripture is from that understanding. When I study the roots of my faith, and the depth of the Hebrew mindset from which scripture is written (vs. the Greek), it is so rich.

Robin @ Be Still and Know said...

You may have already herd of him but the hubs and I attended a weekend seminar a few months ago conducted by Ray Vander Laan. His whole view point is looking at the church through the Hebraic heritage. He is a dynamic speaker and one of the most knowledgeable people I have ever met on the Hebrew culture as well as looking at our connection to that heritage.

He has multiple video series that are available for group study, one of them is called "That the World May Know"

It really opened my eyes to the richness of the symbolism and the meanings of names and the reason behind some of the sacrifices...it was awesome!

Here is the web address for his site.

http://www.followtherabbi.com/Brix?pageID=1458

elaine @ peace for the journey said...

I have a book entitled "Judiasm for Dummies"; Beth Moore has also taught me a lot through her OT videos and workbooks. I never tire of hearing about my spiritual ancestors and their practices therein. We are truly blessed to have so rich a heritage!

peace~elaine

Just a little something from Judy said...

This is a topic I too enjoy studying and realize when I do, just how little I actually know on the history. I know some Messianic Jews and always like hearing what they have to say. I like how you dig in and study what you feel you need to learn, and then you share it with us. Thank you.